<img alt="" src="https://secure.hims1nice.com/151009.png" style="display:none;">

Brad Watson

As KiZAN’s B2B Ambassador, my job is to cut through the buzzword clutter. With a background in broadcasting, writing, advertising, software development, and business ownership, I’m uniquely positioned to help you deflate the “marketing fluff” and identify solutions for the “true” needs of your organization.
Find me on:

Recent Posts

Use Teams Live Events for Your Next Big Meeting

States are beginning to reopen their businesses but large gatherings remain unadvised. No one wants their next meeting to become a cluster for the next coronavirus outbreak. That also being said, everyone wants to have large meetings around this time of year. Colleges and high schools want to hold graduation ceremonies or teach summer classes. Companies want to hold job fairs to hire those new graduates – and they may want to hold all-hands meetings sometime after June 30th to mark the end of Q2.

Building Business Resiliency Through COVID and Beyond

 

In a previous piece, we focused on how to rapidly implement Microsoft Teams in order to get your employees safely working from home. This is an excellent start, but you're not out of the woods yet.

From Office 365 to Microsoft 365 – What’s Going to Change?

Microsoft 365

If there’s one thing Microsoft is unafraid of, it’s rebranding. We saw this play out as Lync became Skype for Business (which gave way to Microsoft Teams), and now Office 365 is becoming Microsoft 365. Right now, the M365 rebrand and updates are primarily consumer-focused, but some updates to familiar office suite applications are available to corporate users as well. What kind of changes – if any – can enterprise customers expect?

Need a rapid deployment of Teams? It is possible.

During our three-part series (starting here) on migrating to Microsoft Teams from Skype for Business, we gave you a lot of information on implementing a very slow and gradual transition. Unfortunately, things have changed. Due to the worldwide spread of coronavirus, you and all your co-workers are likely working from home, which means that your plans might need to accelerate dramatically.

Best Practices for Migrating from Skype for Business to Teams Blog: Part 3 of 3

In this blog series, we have introduced various approaches for migrating to Teams (previous blog entries here: part 1, part 2). Whichever method you choose, you’re going to need to plan carefully.

First, understand who will be most affected by the changeover and get their opinions on the kind of support they’ll need. Then, create a transition timeline that ends with you switching over to Teams by or before the cutoff date. Only then can you choose the correct approach for your organization.

Best Practices for Migrating from Skype for Business to Teams Blog: Part 2 of 3

There is some good news. With a 2021 end of life deadline, there’s still plenty of time for you to train your workers and modify your applications. In addition, there are ways in which you can begin gradually introducing Teams, feature-by-feature, without immediately desisting from its predecessor.

(part 1 of our 3 part blog series is available here)

Best Practices for Migrating from Skype for Business to Teams Blog: Part 1 of  3

When Skype for Business replaced Microsoft Lync back in 2015, we thought that it would be around forever. Nothing remains static in the world of software, however. When Microsoft announced Teams just two years later, we all knew that Skype for Business would one day come to an end. Skype for Business Online will be formally retired on July 31, 2020, and thereafter all-new Office 365 users will be onboarded directly to Teams.

Windows 7 Update – How Goes the Great Migration?

A lot of IT administrators probably wake up each morning, look at the calendar, and sigh. That’s because there’s only three months and change left before January 14, 2020 – the day that Windows 7 is officially end-of-life.

3 Ways to Lower Your TCO with Application Modernization

Applications don't age like fine wine. The older an application is, the less likely it will work natively with newer hardware and software. In turn, this means you'll spend more time maintaining your legacy application and less time building newer and more valuable software. You'll also spend more money. Companies spend up to 80% of their IT budgets maintaining legacy applications.

Website